Facebook lets sketchy Dr. Oz Ad Use Rolling Stone’s name

The other day I clicked on this Facebook ad, chiefly because I was surprised to see Rolling Stone do a story like this:

ShaniaTwainFacebookAd

I landed on a weird page with a Good Housekeeping logo and seemingly nothing to do with Rolling Stone. Here’s the URL:

http://www.individualhosts.com/st-fy/goodhousekeeping/news/indexc.html?voluumdata=vid..00000001-9ad2-4c52-8000-000000000000__vpid..f98bd800-3d14-11e5-852b-f2b8b4cc5cdd__caid..b250df16-0839-4c93-b4b5-8c53296947e3__rt..R__lid..4d193a20-1053-41ab-979b-8b7d9e82aa51__oid1..5df07c75-6138-41dd-9abb-5c91dcb8dde3__oid2..2a30ed04-2c56-4e1e-b32e-ae8c6d586ad4__var1..acctest31n1__rd..www%5C.%5Cfacebook%5C.%5Ccom&CREATIVE_ID=acctest31n1

There are all sorts of other magazine logos on the page including Vanity Fair and People, which are owned by separate companies. The whole thing made no sense.

ShaniaTwainGoodHousekeepingLandingPage

The article itself started off fairly normally for a women’s magazine, although not at all like something you’d see in Rolling Stone, and then it took a strange turn into botox territory.
ShaniaTwainScamArticle

The plot thickened as Dr. Oz got into the act.

ShaniaTwainDrOzScam

All I can say is that this has to be a violation of Facebook’s terms of service and if I were Rolling Stone or any of the other publishers, I would be mad as hell. If Facebook’s going to play in the big publishing leagues, it can’t be doing things like this.

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